"My Murph Experience: Jess Mendoza."

That could be finishing your first full Murph, doing a half, or shooting for PR. Regardless you will walk away with more confidence in your abilities as an athlete coming out of Murph.
 Photo Courtesy of: Samantha Chin

Photo Courtesy of: Samantha Chin

1. Is this your first Murph?
Nope

2. If yes, what inspired you to participate this year?  If no, how many times have you done Murph?
This will be my 2nd Murph this year! 

3. If you’ve done Murph, what do remember most?

Honestly, I recall the second run after those 300 air squats being... No Bueno. I also remember someone made mini carrot cake cupcakes for the BBQ that were pretty good!

4. What are you most looking forward to this year for Murph?
There are two things I love about Murph:

First,  participating in Murph is a chance to expand beyond your regular class community.  Murph is one of the few opportunities we have a year to come together at the same time.  I love seeing and connecting with people that I don't typically get to interact with on a weekly basis because our class schedules do not align. 

Second, straight up I love the challenge of Murph. It's enjoyable to do hard things before noon!

5. For people who are on the fence about participating, what would you say to them?
Take the opportunity to challenge yourself - whatever that means for you.  That could be finishing your first full Murph, doing a half, or shooting for PR. Regardless you will walk away with more confidence in your abilities as an athlete coming out of Murph.


"My Murph Experience: Mike Maresh"

There’s plenty of time to spend at the lake BBQing and enjoying a few cold ones, but this opportunity only comes once a year and the thrill of completing something this challenging puts you into a pretty selective group of people.
 Photo Courtesy of: Samantha Chin

Photo Courtesy of: Samantha Chin

1. Is this your first Murph?
No

2. If yes, what inspired you to participate this year?  If no, how many times have you done Murph?
No, this will be my second Murph

3. If you’ve done Murph, what do remember most?
It is a very humbling experience.  On paper there isn't one movement that seems all that daunting, however, in practice, it is quite a different story.  I also remember the overwhelming support of people who are there offering encouragement. 

4. What are you most looking forward to this year for Murph?
The challenge.  I went into it last year without any experience, expectations or goals which made it very difficult to stay focused.  I was relatively new to CF at the time and now that I have some context for what the Murph is all about I'm excited to push my limits and see what happens. 

5. For people who are on the fence about participating, what would you say to them?
I really can't think of a better way to celebrate Memorial day then by memorializing a Fallen Hero.  There's plenty of time to spend at the lake BBQing and enjoying a few cold ones, but this opportunity only comes once a year and the thrill of completing something this challenging puts you into a pretty selective group of people.  Not only do you get the chance to memorialize someone but you also have the chance to do so in a pretty unique and awesome way.


"Prepping for Murph: Part 2 - No Matter How You Break It Up, The Number is Still 200."

Well, Murph is a once-in-a-year event and very much an “outlier” on the programming spectrum. The total workload that athletes complete is very high. I want to prepare athletes to be able to complete the workout first.
 Photo Courtesy of: Sean O'Brien

Photo Courtesy of: Sean O'Brien

This week in our "Prepping for Murph blog," I want to talk about push-ups.  It doesn’t matter how you break it up, the workout calls for 200 reps!  So before I dive into program design, let's use the same equation we looked at last week to gain some metrics.

200 push-ups is a considerable amount of upper body pushing volume for one workout.  If I take my current bodyweight of 170 lbs. (no added weight vest) and multiply that by 200, I get 34,000 lbs. 

Here is the equation:

170 BW (no added vest) x 200 = 34,000 lbs. BW moved.  

As a coach, I looked at this number and with a grain of salt.  What I mean by that is, in any given week, I am not going to program a workout with the same amount of volume.  Why?  Well, Murph is a once-in-a-year event and very much an "outlier" on the programming spectrum.  The total workload that athletes complete is very high. I want to prepare athletes to be able to complete the workout first.  Once they have achieved this, we can begin to have discussions about improving performance and shooting for PR’s in later years.

Let’s look at last week programming to see how this all fits.  Last Saturday was a high volume day for pressing.  The reason behind this was that I wanted athletes to have a day that required them to press after they had a week of training under their belts.  Here was last Saturday’s training and how my numbers correlate:

  1. Bench Press - 3 x 4 @ 175# =  2100 lbs. moved
  2. 3 RFT of 15 Thrusters + 15 Burpees = 4275 lbs. moved (Thrusters) + 7650 lbs. moved (burpees)
  3. Total amount of weight moved = 14,025 lbs. moved

Knowing that I can move 14,045 lbs. at the end of your training week is helpful from a programming standpoint.  The key is that this loading is appropriate for what I am trying to achieve in a single session and it comes after 6 previous days that included wall balls, dips, burpees, and snatching.  

So hopefully that helps and sheds some light on how we are preparing athletes to COMPLETE Murph this year.

Stay tuned next week as we look at pull-ups and how we prepare for those!

- Coach Danny


"My Murph Experience: Amanda Yeager"

This year will be my sixth year doing Murph. I feel like I can say I’ve completed Murph in every kind of way. I’ve done Murph solo, partnered, with a weight vest, without a weight vest, partitioned and unpartitioned and I’ve even done Murph pregnant, lol.
 Photo Courtesy of: Samantha Chin

Photo Courtesy of: Samantha Chin

1. Is this your first Murph?
NO!

2. How many times have you done Murph?
This year will be my sixth year doing Murph.  I feel like I can say I’ve completed Murph in every kind of way.  I’ve done Murph solo, partnered, with a weight vest, without a weight vest, partitioned and unpartitioned and I’ve even done Murph pregnant, lol.

3. If you’ve done Murph, what do remember most?
The most memorable part of Murph is being in the middle of your sets of pull-ups, pushups, and squats and seeing everyone else there and hearing your friends cheer for you and, "thinking just keep moving!"

4. What are you most looking forward to this year for Murph?
Being able to breathe during the run and seeing Maddox’s face while he’s watching everybody work so hard - he loves watching everyone workout, he just soaks it all in.

5. For people who are on the fence about participating, what would you say to them?
I always tell people to try it.  Murph is not a sprint, really kind of a paced workout and you do what you can do.  It’s about honoring Memorial Day and those that gave their lives for our country.  Try it, partner-style if you are nervous, it’s probably the most fun I’ve had doing it with Danny last year.  


 

 

"Prepping for Murph: Part 1 - Why So Many Wall Balls?"

With Murph on the horizon, I know that I need to prepare the lower body to handle 2 miles of running and 300 air squats at bodyweight. To use myself as an example, I need to be able to carry 170 lbs. 10,560 feet and squat 51,000 lbs.
 Photo Courtesy of: Samantha Chin

Photo Courtesy of: Samantha Chin

Every week for the last month or so I have been getting asked one specific question, “why so many wall balls?!”  I get it.  Wall balls are usually on the lost of "Top 3 Least Favorite Movements" for most CrossFitters, but they do serve a purpose in training.  

As coaches, our responsibility is to provide you with thoughtful and intentional workouts. The goal of these workouts should be centered around an event or overarching goal, so we have a metric to follow.  You may or may not have noticed, but we have been emphasizing movements that will prepare you for Murph on May 28th.  What is Murph you ask? See last weeks blog post if you are unfamiliar.

Now, at first glance, it may seem pretty easy to program workouts.  Pick movements that are hard, add some reps and rounds, pick a few weights, add a time cap and watch the heavy breathing begin!  

I assure you, it takes more than that. Programming workouts, in my opinion, is an art form. You have to consider the following:

  1. Loading: how much weight will be moved?
  2. Volume: how many times will that weight be moved? 
  3. Intensity: what is the desired stimulus of this movement?
  4. Overload. how will this particular movement affect an individuals ability to work out the rest of the week, in relation to all of the other movements programmed?"

You still might be asking, “why all of the wall balls?”.  Let me explain.  When I sit down to program a workout or write a strength cycle, I look at what we are trying to achieve.  With Murph on the horizon, I know that I need to prepare the lower body to handle 2 miles of running and 300 air squats at bodyweight.  To use myself as an example, I need to be able to carry 170 lbs. 10,560 feet and squat 51,000 lbs.  How did I find those metrics? 

5,280 (distance of 1 mile in feet) x 2 = 10,560 feet.  170 lbs. (my current bodyweight) x 300 = 51,000 lbs.  

Let's look at this past Monday (5/07/18) and see how that correlates with my numbers:

  1. Back squat. 3 x 8 @ 245 lbs. = 5,880 lbs. moved (not including BW)
  2. 96 Wall balls. 20 lbs. x 96 = 1920 lbs. moved (not including BW)
  3. The total amount of weight moved = 7,880 lbs.

From a programming perspective, this is helpful.  I am moving roughly 7,880 lbs. on Monday.  This number keeps me well behind the 51,000 that will be moved on Murph, therefore it allows me to look at adding more volume later in the week.  

So there you have it.  The increased amount of wall balls that you have been seeing is all about preparing you for Murph.  We want everyone to be in the best shape they can be for that day.  This year it will be my 8th time completing Murph.  Every year I am always amazed how certain parts chew me up, but that is what makes it special. 

Stay tuned for more blog entries, where I will break down all of the other movements you will see in Murph! 

- Coach Danny


"My Murph Experience: Zach Forschler"


But what we are all really doing Murph for is deeper than that, we are all just waiting to see how fast Dave and Alex take their shirts off.
 Photo Courtesy of: Samantha Chin

Photo Courtesy of: Samantha Chin

1. Is this your first Murph?

No, Murph in 2015 was my first Memorial Day Murph at Kingfield. It was also my 2nd workout at Kingfield and when I decided to join

2. If you’ve done Murph, what do you remember most?

Murph is a blast! A bunch of people who know they should not stop moving and all they want to do is take a break. The group is very important to me during Murph. You don’t want to fall too far behind the person next to you because then you have to start counting for yourself rather than depending on them knowing what round you are on, and you have absolutely no idea if this is round 4 or 6.

3. What are you most looking forward to this year for Murph?

Mary’s baking, Bens smoked meat, and whatever Larkin brings.
But what we are all really doing Murph for is deeper than that, we are all just waiting to see how fast Dave and Alex take their shirts off.

5. For people who are on the fence about participating, what would you say to them?

Show up. What else are you going to do? Do a half Murph and I bet Marcus will motivate you to just keep going and all of a sudden it turns into a full Murph. Or just come, Dave and Alex will be shirtless so that’s worth it. It’s not about the workout, it’s about the party.


 

 

Who is Murph? And WHY do we do this workout?

Michael_P._Murphy.jpg

Reposted from April 2017

Lietenant Michael P. Murphy, or “Murph,” was born May 7, 1976 in Suffolk County, New York. After graduating from Penn State University, he accepted commission in the Navy and became a U.S. Navy SEAL in July 2002.

On June 28, 2005, he and his team were on a mission to capture or kill top Taliban leader Ahmad Shah. They had successfully found Shah’s safe-house and infiltrated the area when they ran into some goat herders. They debated what to do with the herders, obviously concerned they might tip Taliban hostiles off on their presence in the area. Ultimately, they decided to let them go. Shortly after, the Taliban forces were alerted of their presence and the team was caught on the hillside taking heavy fire.

Murph died that day, while moving to an exposed position, to get a contact signal to headquarters to support his team (the story of his final mission is well portrayed in the movie Lone Survivor). After his death, Murph was awarded the Medal of Honor for actions during War in Afghanistan. He is the first U.S. Navy member to receive the award since Vietnam, and has also been posthumously awarded The Silver Star Medal & Purple Heart. His SEAL team, all but one who died on the mission that took Murphy’s life, is the most decorated SEAL team in history for their actions that day.

The CrossFit Hero workout we at Crossfit Kingfield and thousands of other CrossFit gyms will do on Memorial Day was his favorite workout. He called it “Body Armor,” hence why in CrossFit’s description to wear a weighted vest, or "body armor."

The workout is…

For time:

1 mile run

Partition anyway you like:

100 pull-ups
200 push-ups
300 air squats

1 mile run

“Murph” is a longstanding tradition on Memorial Day. We encourage you to think of his story and that of any other serviceman or woman, known or unknown, who has died protecting our country. Especially in times of turmoil and discord, it is important to remember that, despite who leads, despite who threatens, despite the current state of affairs, there are brave men and women who willingly sacrifice their lives for our country. It is because of them that we are free and can participate in the things we love with the people we love.

For 2018: We hope you will join us in honoring our country’s military on Memorial Day this year. We will run heats of the workout and finish things off with a BBQ afterwards. The heat sheet email has gone out. On that, you will also be able to select an item (or items) to bring to the cookout! We will have an option for kids as well as friends and family who are not members of the gym. Our goal is to celebrate what we get to enjoy as a result of these brave sacrifices: friends, family, fitness and fun.

Looking forward to seeing you there!

-Coach Caitlin

18.5 Briefing + Heat Times

IMG_6633.jpg

Whoo Hoo! You made it! The last week and here is the repeat we’ve all been waiting for. Good news - it’s short and sweet. Bad news - you should go fast and it’s gonna hurt. Here is your weekly briefing:

First, below are the listed heat times. We have budgeted 13 minutes between heats for you to warm-up thrusters and pull-ups in the workout space. See below for more details. We ask for and appreciate your flexibility!

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You will also notice on the table that we have listed the number of judges needed for each heat. We NEED help judging! If you can help at least one time before or after you go, that is a huge help to the coaches!

If for any reason you cannot attend at the time you are listed, you need to notify me (caitlin@crossfitkingfield.com) as soon as possible.

Second, REMEMBER THAT YOUR LISTED TIME IS YOUR START TIME! If you are in the 5pm heat, arrive with enough time to warm-up prior to the workout. As always, we have included a warm-up below. You will have time to warm-up the thrusters and pull-ups on the event floor before your heat.

In case you haven’t seen yet, here is the workout:

Open Workout 18.5

7 minute AMRAP

3 - 6 - 9 - 12 - 15…

Thrusters (100/65)
Chest-to-bar pull-ups

*Continue adding 3 reps to both movements until time expires.

Scaled athlete will perform jumping chin-over-bar pull-ups. Weights are 65/45.

A few quick notes on the workout:

1. Picking your division. Can you do chest-to-bar pull-ups? If the answer is no, then scaled is the route for you. If you can do singles or doubles of the C2B pull-ups, you get to decide if you want to go for it Rx’d. Do NOT underestimate the jumping pull-ups! That gets just as nasty because it keeps you moving!

If it’s the thrusters you are worried about, decide if it’s a weight you feel you can do for at least 6 reps in a row even when you’re dead tired. They should be light to moderate in weight, certainly NOT heavy!

WE ARE GOING TO STICK TO THE PRESCRIPTIONS AS LISTED! Please have an idea of which division you want to go for when you arrive. If you’re still unsure, talk to a coach!

2. Break. It. Up. While a fast, short workout, your shoulders and lungs are going to explode if you come out too hot with big sets.

First, identify your “sticky” movement - is thrusters? Is it pull-ups? This movement will be the one we break up first and the one where we know we can buy a few extra breaths while we take those breaks. If I know I’m going to have to break up the pull-ups, I’m going to push a little more on the thrusters.

Second, understand your capacity. This thing just keeps going up so eventually everyone, even the best in the world, have to break their sets. If you can do 20 pull-ups unbroken, you may consider going through the single digit sets unbroken (3-6-9) but understand the cost of those sets. If you’re not as proficient, you might consider keeping your sets smaller from the beginning (2s or 3s).

A quick note on pull-ups, specifically C2B: there is no rule on how you have to have your hands to complete a rep. When you start to get tired, going to a mixed or all underhand grip can buy you a few more reps than you might have had otherwise!

3. It’s ONLY 7 minutes. Give. It. Hell! This is it, guys, the end of the Open and we have a burner. There’s no hold up, just pure grit and grind. It will feel long to start and then you’ll wonder where the time went, so don’t leave anything on the floor!

4. Warming up. We have a specific warm-up listed below. As we mentioned above, we’ve kept time between heats for you guys to warm up the pull-ups and thrusters in your workout space. We will give you about 4 minutes to warm-up the thruster and then take another 5 to get your pull-ups situated. We’ll use the remaining 4-5 minutes or so for your judge to come brief you on the movement standards for the workout and do a group warm-up.

FOR TONIGHT: NOTE ON THE HEAT SHEET THE TIME THAT YOUR HEAT WILL BE CALLED. PLEASE BE IN THE MAIN ROOM AT THAT TIME SO YOU MAXIMIZE YOUR WARM-UP TIME.

DO NOT WARM UP IN THE TURF ROOM. WE WILL GIVE YOU TIME TO DO THAT BEFORE YOUR HEAT. Instead spend your time following the below mobilization protocol.

For the general warm-up, please use the back room again. The Turf Room will be closed until classes are completed. PLEASE DO NOT DISRUPT CLASS!

18.5 Warm-up

3 rounds, nasal breathing only

7 burpees
10 Russian KB swings
0:45 second goblet squat hold

 

Lat/shoulder/chest mobilization, 3 rounds

10 PVC pass throughs
10 banded pull aparts
0:30 seconds/side twisted cross (or any kind of chest opener)

 

Thruster warm-up, 3 rounds

5/arm single-arm DB Front squats
5/arm single-arm DB push presses
5/arm single-arm DB thrusters, pause 1 second at the top of each rep

*Use a light weight. Focus on connecting your breathing with your movement. That will be key in this workout. Exhale as the weight leaves your shoulders, inhale as the weight returns to your shoulders. Hold in the bottom of the squat.

We believe this warm-up will take about 10-12 minutes to complete. If you need more time to mobilize, etc. budget accordingly. Once your heat is called, you will do the following:

4 minutes: Warm-up the thruster. A few sets of front squats and presses with the empty bar followed by a few thrusters will suffice. Get to your working weight and practice the same breathing pattern you used with the DB in warm ups.

4-5 minutes: Warm-up the pull-up. If you are performing jumping pull-ups, grab anything you need to get to the height required for the movement. Check in with your judge to make sure you meet the standards.

Immediately before your heat begins, the group will perform a warm-up together and then roll!

5. Using Fran to gauge your goals. In this workout, when you complete the round of 15 pull-ups you have completed the same number of reps (90) as you would in Fran. If you know your Fran time, you'll have an idea of where you might end up. Keep in mind, the pull-ups are harder and the thrusters for you gentlemen slightly heavier.

General rule of thumb: If you have a sub-5 minute Fran time normally, you can expect to make it to the round of 15 in this workout. The faster your Fran time is, the further you can expect to get. If you have a Fran time longer than 5 minutes, shoot for the 12s. You may just surprise yourself!

5. Have fun and CONGRATS!!! You guys DID IT! You made it through the 2018 Open! Whether this was your first Open or your sixth, it is quite the accomplishment and your coaches are proud of you! We would encourage you to take the time after the Open to identify skills or movements you’d like to work on and make a point to seek out guidance to improve these areas so you can crush more Open workouts (and every workout in between!) in 2019!

That's all we have for now. We will see you all tonight! Good luck!